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UFC GYM JUDO: THROWING TECHNIQUES - [HIP TECHNIQUES] [HAND TECHNIQUES] & [FOOT & LEG TECHNIQUES]


                  

*NAGE WAZA - Judo Throwing Techniques

          柔道 JUDO

        柔道 - IPPON GACHI [WIN BY IPPON]

Judo is quite a hard sport and you have to be really fit and focused when you are up against an opponent. To prepare yourself is very simple, it just takes proper and hard Judo training. 

UFC GYM JUDO TORRANCE

                                "As always, you get what you put into it"

 

           (SHUNEN-TOTAL COMMITMENT TO ONE'S PURPOSE)

12-Examples Tachi Waza [Standing Techniques]

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                   KOSHI WAZA [Hip Techniques]

 
(1) O-Goshi  (Large Hip Throw)

This is the Waza on which all Koshi waza (Hip techniques) are based.

Ilias Iliadis - Olympic Gold Medalist

Features of this Waza

The O-goshi (Large hip throw) consists of throwing the opponent over your hip and to the floor.

Waza details

From the natural posture, Tori (Player executing technique) releases his Tsurite (Lifting hand) and extends it around under Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) armpit to his back.


Tori (Player executing technique) then quickly grasps the back of Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) belt, spins his body around while pulling Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) waist against his back.


With his waist lower than Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack), he pulls Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) onto his hip and then rotates to throw him down.
The footwork during this throw is the same as that during the Seoi-nage (Shoulder throw).

During actual competition, this Waza often begins by stepping forward from the side (rather than from a head-on stance), and with the hip then being pushed against the opponent. This Waza is effective when there is some distance between the two combatants, as when in a Kenka yotsu (Asymmetrical grips by the two opponents) stance (asymmetrical grips by the two opponents), etc., where other Waza are unfeasible.

Although the use of this Waza is infrequent in actual competition, it is a fundamental Waza for all Judo ranks, and its history is an old one.

Waza usage tip

  • When reaching around the opponent's waist to grasp the back of his belt, weaker combatants reach beneath the opponent's armpit. Stronger combatants, on the other hand, may reach around the outside of the opponent's arm.
  • Once he has grasped the back of Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) belt, Tori (Player executing technique) must bend the elbow of that arm and pull Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) snugly against his hip.

(2) Koshi Guruma  (Hip Wheel)


Summary

This Waza features a dynamic rotational throw over the hips.

Features of this Waza

In the Koshi-guruma (Hip wheel) Waza, Tori (Player executing technique) wraps an arm around the back of Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) neck and brings him onto the back of his hip, then spins like a wheel to throw him.

Waza details

In this Waza, Tori (Player executing technique) grasps Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) mid-sleeve area with his Hiki-te (Pulling hand), and the back of Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) collar with his Tsurite (Lifting hand).


Tori (Player executing technique) then uses his pulling hand to pull Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) forward, while shifting his lifting hand from the back of the collar to a posture in which his arm is around Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) neck.
When pulled forward by Tori (Player executing technique) pulling hand, Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) body moves toward Tori (Player executing technique) pulling hand side, thus inducing him to take a step forward.


At this point, Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) is in a sideways posture. As Tori (Player executing technique) wraps his arm around Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) neck, he quickly spins and places his hip against Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack). Tori (Player executing technique) does this while also bending his knees and leaning his upper body forward, thereby further destabilizing Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) balance toward the front.


Pushing his hips deep so that they are crossways to Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) hips, Tori (Player executing technique) uses both the spring force generated by straightening his knees, and the force of his arm around Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) neck, to throw Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) over his hips and to the ground.

Waza usage tip

  • Tori (Player executing technique) must make effective use of his pulling hand, and when executing the throw, he must keep his side firmly closed.
  • Tori (Player executing technique) must release his arm from around Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) neck just before Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) hits the floor, and must gauge his pulling hand Zanshin (Awareness) (posture following the attack, in which the attacker remains watchful while reducing the force).

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          TE WAZA [Hand Techniques]

(3) Ippon Seoi-nage  (One Arm Shoulder Throw)

Mark Huizinga: Olympic Champion below

 
.......
(4) Morote Seoi-nage  (Shoulder Throw)
 

Summary

This one of the most dynamic and best known Judo Waza, and is a good example of the Judo maxim, "softness subdues hardness".

Features of this Waza

This technique consists of bringing your opponent against your back, and then throwing him over your shoulder.

Waza details

From the natural posture, Tori (Player executing technique) rolls the wrist of his Hiki-te (Pulling hand) over while pulling Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) forward until the Hiki-te (Pulling hand) is at eye height.


This pulling action destabilizes Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) balance and shifts his Center of gravity to his toes, thus making this Waza easier to perform.
Tori (Player executing technique) Tsurite (Lifting hand) grasps Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) lapel area in a twisting motion to secure a stronger grip. Using both hands, Tori (Player executing technique) spins, steps back, and pulls Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) against his back, all in a sudden motion.


Although the Kumi-kata (Fighting grips), the use of hands and feet, and the motions of this Waza are identical in both men's and women's Judo, women have weaker lower body muscles, often causing their knees to buckle when attempting this Waza. Therefore, women must give more attention to the proper timing of this Waza than men.


The Seoi-nage (Shoulder throw) is one of Judo's most colorful Waza, and a perfect example of Judo's "softness subdues hardness" philosophy in that it allows even a small combatant to throw a larger opponent. Moreover, it is a Waza that is well suited to the Japanese physical stature in which short legs and arms are the norm.


Although this Waza is often performed in competitions by both men and women, regardless of rank, it is particularly common in lightweight division competitions, and in primary and junior high school student competitions. Furthermore, in international competitions, this Waza is seen by the Japanese combatants as an effective weapon against relatively larger-statured foreigners.

Waza usage tip

  • This Waza receives depends on the powerful spring force generated by flexing the knees.

(5) Tai-otoshi  (Body Drop)

Summary

This is a basic Judo Te waza (Hand techniques) centered on the use of the Tsurite (Lifting hand) and the footwork.

Features of this Waza

To perform a Tai-otoshi (Body drop), you must destabilize the opponent toward the forward right corner, and then throw the opponent down in a diagonal manner over your side.

Waza details

The Kata (Form) of this Waza closely resembles that of the Seoi-otoshi (Shoulder drop).

One leg is extended outward and is used as the fulcrum over which to topple the opponent.

The use of the Tsurite (Lifting hand) is of particular importance in this Waza. Tori (Player executing technique) Tsurite (Lifting hand) grasps Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) lapel area, and then lifts Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) with elbow extended outward. As the lift is applied, Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) heels lift off the floor, making him easier to pull. Although the Tai-otoshi (Body drop) is frequently used in both men's and women's competition, it is also known as a Choshi-waza (Timing technique) where light-footed motion is critical, and is therefore most often seen in contests between two small-statured combatants.

Waza usage tip

  • This Waza must be applied at the precise moment the opponent begins forward or lateral motion.
  • The toes of the extended "fulcrum" leg must be pointing toward the Support leg in order to avoid injury.

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           ASHI WAZA [Foot/Leg Techniques]

(6) Osoto Gari  (Large Outer Reap)

Summary


This Ashi waza (Foot / leg techniques) employs a "destabilize the upper body, reap the lower body" strategy, and is effective in competition.

Features of this Waza

The Osoto-gari (Large outer reap) consists of pulling the opponent forward to destabilize him, and then sweeping his leg out from under him like a sickle cutting grass.

Waza details

In order to easily pull Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) forward, Tori (Player executing technique) Tsurite (Lifting hand) grasps Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) collarbone area, and his Hiki-te (Pulling hand) grasps Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) sleeve just below Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) elbow.


Tori (Player executing technique) pulls Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) toward Tori (Player executing technique) Hiki-te (Pulling hand) side while moving forward toward Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack), and extends his Support leg to the outer side Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) Tsurite (Lifting hand).


At the same time, Tori (Player executing technique) bends the knee of this Tsurite (Lifting hand) side leg and prepares to move behind Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack).


By Pulling Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) body snugly against his own at this time, Tori (Player executing technique) tilts Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) Center of gravity to one side, and the other leg lifts, shifting his body weight to the leg that Tori (Player executing technique) intends to reap.


At moment when Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) Center of gravity tilts, Tori (Player executing technique) swings his reaping leg around Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) body-weight supporting leg and reaps it in a sudden back-to-front motion.


The reaped leg swings out behind Tori (Player executing technique), and by continuing to swing the leg upward until the bottom of the foot is facing the ceiling, Tori (Player executing technique) can complete a strong Osoto-gari (Large outer reap) Waza without losing power.


The Osoto-gari (Large outer reap) Waza is both a fundamental and representative Judo Waza.


Although it appears simple, it actually requires proper execution of several fine points, and is therefore difficult.

Waza usage tip

  • Even if Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) suspects the Osoto-gari (Large outer reap) Waza and effectively defends against it, Tori (Player executing technique) can still catch Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) knee with his reaping leg and begin hopping on one leg with his Tsurite (Lifting hand) pushing against Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) jaw in order to destabilize him.
.
(7) Ouchi Gari  (Large Inner Reap)

Summary

This is a representative Judo Waza in which the attacker moves straight into the opponent's chest.

Kim Jae-bum: OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALIST

Features of this Waza

The Ouchi-gari (Large inner reap) consists of moving straight into the opponent's chest, and then executing a leg reap from the inner side to throw the opponent onto his back.

French style Ouchi gari

Waza details

From the natural posture, Tori (Player executing technique) takes a step forward while pulling Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) toward him, then moves his Support leg forward behind his advanced leg. 


Although Tori (Player executing technique) leg is at right angles to Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) at this point, Tori (Player executing technique) makes sure that his chest is squarely facing Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) chest.


Tori (Player executing technique) pulls Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) body snugly against his own, then, while destabilizing Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) balance with his Tsurite (Lifting hand), Tori (Player executing technique) places his reaping foot at the inner side of Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) leg in preparation for the reap.


The foot reap can be performed in two different ways when executing the Ouchi-gari (Large inner reap). One way is swing the reaping foot in a half circle in order to spread Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) legs and destabilize his balance. The other way is to engage Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) leg with the reaping foot, and reap Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) foot while hopping several times on one leg in the backward direction.


The Tsurite (Lifting hand) can also be used in different ways. Tori (Player executing technique) can use his Tsurite (Lifting hand) to pull the collar of Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) uniform downward to destabilize his balance, or he can destabilize Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) by pushing Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) shoulder.


The "pulling the collar downward" method is advantageous for a small-statured combatant when facing a larger opponent.


Because the Ouchi-gari (Large inner reap) is used to destabilize the opponent in the backward direction, Tori (Player executing technique) can feign a forward-throw Waza, and when Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) moves backward to protect himself, Tori (Player executing technique) can execute this Ouchi-gari (Large inner reap). This Waza can also be applied as a transition to another Waza.

Waza usage tip

  • Although a foot reap is usually applied to the opponents lower leg (below the calf), the opponent will be able to free his leg if the foot reap position is too low.
  • When destabilizing Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) by pulling downward with the Tsurite (Lifting hand), Tori (Player executing technique) must pull Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) collar strongly as if to pull off his uniform. This ensures that the arms of both opponents are directly opposed to each other, making it more difficult for Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) to escape. Tori (Player executing technique) then pulls downward with his Hiki-te (Pulling hand).

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(8) Kouchi Gari  (Small Inner Reap)

Summary

This is a basic Ashi waza (Foot / leg techniques) which requires clean and decisive movement in order to topple the opponent.

Marti Malloy 2012 Olympic Bronze Medalist

Features of this Waza

The Kouchi-gari (Small inner reap) consists of reaping the opponent's heel in a scooping motion, in order to topple him.

Waza details

This Waza can also be applied while either advancing toward, or retreating from, the opponent. When applied from an advancing posture, Tori (Player executing technique) destabilizes Tori (Player executing technique) upper body by using his Tsurite (Lifting hand) to push Tori (Player executing technique) jaw upward while at the same time wringing Tori (Player executing technique) sleeve with his Hiki-te (Pulling hand), keeping his elbow close to his side.


Tori (Player executing technique) then quickly reaps Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) leg.


When performed from a retreating posture, this Waza must be executed at the precise moment that Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) advances.


While wringing his Tsurite (Lifting hand) and Hiki-te (Pulling hand) grips, Tori (Player executing technique) pulls Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) forward to destabilize him, then, as Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) steps forward, Tori (Player executing technique) reaps Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) advanced leg in a scooping motion at the precise moment that the foot touches the floor.


A variation of this Waza is the Sutemi-kouchi (Sacrifice small inner reap) which is often used effectively by women and other small-statured combatants.


In this variation, Tori (Player executing technique) turns his back to Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack), and when contact with Tori (Player executing technique) body is made, Tori (Player executing technique) wraps his reaping leg around Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) foot and then pushes him down.


Because this variation entails the sacrifice of one's own posture, it does not offer an easy transition to another Waza, but it often wins more points than the basic Kouchi-gari (Small inner reap).

Waza usage tip

  • The leg reap is more easily performed by engaging the opponent's heel with the arch of the foot, and reaping the foot in the direction of its toes.
.
(9) De-ashi-harai  (Forward Foot Sweep) 

Summary

This Ashi waza (Foot / leg techniques) is a high-level foot technique which requires perfect timing.

Features of this Waza

The De-ashi-barai (-harai) (Forward foot sweep) Waza consists of sweeping the opponent's feet out from under him, and then throwing him down on his side.

Waza details

From the natural posture, Tori (Player executing technique) moves forward as if to attack, and at the moment when Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) begins to raise his foot to retreat, Tori (Player executing technique) executes this foot sweep.


The sweep must be executed at the moment Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) foot leaves the floor.


Because the sweep must be executed with considerable force, Tori (Player executing technique) straightens his posture to maintain good balance during the sweep.


To facilitate the sweep, Tori (Player executing technique) pulls Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) Tsurite (Lifting hand) downward to destabilize him.


As Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) balance is destabilized to the side, Tori (Player executing technique) executes the sweep in one quick motion.


In some cases, after hooking Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) foot in the sweep, Tori (Player executing technique) may hop for several steps on one foot before completing the sweep.


This Waza is best suited for combatants with coordinated foot skills, for lightweight division combatants, and for small-statured women.


Timing is crucial to the success of the De-ashi-barai (-harai) (Forward foot sweep) Waza, and it is therefore difficult to execute without considerable experience.


Do to its difficulty and the "Judo sense" which it requires, this Waza is often awarded an Ippon gachi (Win by ippon).


Even when unsuccessful, this Waza will often destabilize the opponent, offering the opportunity to transition to another Waza.

Waza usage tip

  • The sweeping kick must be performed swiftly from the Grappling stance.
  • In order to facilitate the sweep, the arch of Tori (Player executing technique) sweeping foot should strike Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) just below the ankle. Striking with the arch of the foot ensures better contact.

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(10) Okuri-ashi-harai  (Following Foot Sweep) 

Sanjaasuren MGL - Dragin FRA: Okuri Ashi Barai

Summary

This is a dynamic Ashi waza (Foot / leg techniques) which requires precise timing.

Isao Okano - Olympic Gold Medalist 

Features of this Waza

The Okuri-ashi-barai (-harai) (Foot sweep) is performed from a Grappling stance, and consists of sweeping the opponent's leg out from under him as he moves laterally.

Waza details

When the opponent attempts rapid lateral movement from a Grappling stance, Tori (Player executing technique) sweeps Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) legs in the lateral direction in which Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) is moving. Tori (Player executing technique) executes this sweep at the precise moment when Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) is raised onto his toes, just before the lateral motion begins.


Tori (Player executing technique) performs the sweep by turning his ankle inward, and then sweeping the arch of his foot against Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) ankle.


If the timing is right and the speed sufficient, the Okuri-ashi-barai (-harai) (Foot sweep) Waza can be used to throw Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) in a dynamic throw which requires little power.


Relatively weak combatants often use this Waza to throw a stronger combatant by waiting for a face-to-face stance and the right timing, and this Waza often results in an upset win.

Waza usage tip

  • A skillful opponent may fall onto his stomach at the moment this leg sweep Waza is attempted, thereby preventing Tori (Player executing technique) from being awarded any points. To prevent this, Tori (Player executing technique) must grasp Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) firmly with his Hiki-te (Pulling hand).
.
(11) Sasae-tsurikomi-ashi  (Lifting Pulling Ankle Block)

Summary

This Ashi waza (Foot / leg techniques) requires that the hand be rotated as if turning the steering wheel of a car.

Yasuyuki Muneta: World Champion

Features of this Waza

The Sasae-tsurikomi-ashi (Supporting foot lift-pull throw) Waza consists of rotating the Tsurite (Lifting hand) and foot 180 degrees to throw the opponent in a sudden motion.

Waza details

From the natural posture, Tori (Player executing technique) takes a big step toward Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) so that his body is snugly against Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack), then, while pulling Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) with his Hiki-te (Pulling hand), Tori (Player executing technique) uses that forward-stepped foot as a fulcrum and reverses his body motion, sweeping the arch of his foot (the Hiki-te (Pulling hand) side foot) against Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) ankle.


As Tori (Player executing technique) body motion reverses, he also pulls Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) forward, thus destabilizing Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) balance.


Tori (Player executing technique) then twists his lifting and Hiki-te (Pulling hand) as if turning the steering wheel of a car, and throws Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) down.


Even when unsuccessful, this Waza will often destabilize the opponent, offering the opportunity to transition to another Waza. In actual competition, a combatant will often feign this Waza before executing the Osoto-gari (Large outer reap)

.

Waza usage tip

  • Attempting this throw with the hands alone will likely end in failure. One must also use the momentum from the body motion reversal, and use the leg as the fulcrum for the body rotation.
  • Taking a large step forward with the Support leg increases the effectiveness of the body's twisting motion.
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(12) Uchi-mata  (Inner Thigh Reaping Throw)

Summary

This is a dynamic Ashi waza (Foot / leg techniques) that requires a keen sense of timing.

Features of this Waza

The Uchi-mata (Inner-thigh reaping throw) consists of destabilizing the opponent diagonally toward the front, and then using the back of the thigh to throw him.

Waza details

Tori (Player executing technique) grasps Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) collar with his Tsurite (Lifting hand), and lifts to a height above Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) ear.


Turning the wrist of his Hiki-te (Pulling hand) so that its palm is facing outward, he pulls Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) forward while raising that hand to the height of his eyes.


Using both his Tsurite (Lifting hand) and Hiki-te (Pulling hand), he destabilizes Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) diagonally toward the front, and then throws him down.


Tori (Player executing technique) performs the throw by placing the back side of his thigh between Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) legs, and then swinging it upward in a sudden motion.


This Waza often results in an Ippon gachi (Win by ippon) in competitions, and it has a number of variations.


This Waza can also be performed by hopping on one leg several times after engaging Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) leg.

Waza usage tip

  • Destabilizing the opponent in the front direction can be facilitated by turning one's face in the Hiki-te (Pulling hand) pulling direction while pulling the opponent.
  • The rotation of the Hiki-te (Pulling hand) and body are important factors during the throw.
  • Bending both knees allows the spring force of the knees to be employed as well.

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UFC GYM JUDO - "AS REAL AS IT GETS"

                             柔道 JUDO

            (TAISHI-AMBITION)   (TOSHI-FIGHTING WILL)   (TOKON-FIGHTING SPIRIT)

UFC GYM JUDO TORRANCE

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